Black History of Coffee: Exploring the Deep Roots and Legacy of African Americans in Coffee Production and Consumption

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Introduction

This article celebrates African Americans’ pivotal role in coffee’s history and culture, from its Ethiopian beginnings and heartwrenching journey across the globe to its inevitably positive impact in America.

Coffee is a cultural connector, sparks conversations, inspires creativity, and transcends being just a beverage, and by proxy, we must show gratitude for the Africans who discovered it. During Black History Month, we wanted to highlight the community’s resilience, innovation, and legacy in the coffee trade, and explore coffee’s journey from the Ethiopian highlands to American coffee culture, emphasizing African Americans’ contributions despite numerous known and unknown historical challenges.

So, join us in recognizing not just the eternal spirit of African Americans, but also their role as harbingers in shaping the coffee industry and making the beverage a symbol of cultural expression.

Ethiopian woman wearing traditional clothing and serving coffee in small cups. - "The Black History of Coffee"

A Tale of How the Black History of Coffee Began

Kaldi The Goat Herder

It’s widely believed and accepted that coffee’s journey began in the fertile highlands of Ethiopia, a land hailed as its birthplace. Here is where the Oromo people first cultivated coffee cherries, and the tale of their discovery traces back to a mere observation when a goat herder named Kaldi noticed strange behavior from his goats on any ordinary day.

A Tanzania citizen herding their goats on a dirt road at a large mountain base. - "The Black History of Coffee"

They had a certain liveliness he hadn’t seen before and noticed this as they grazed upon a bush covered with coffee cherries. Curiosity piqued, Kaldi sampled what he probably thought was a basic fruit, but soon he too was dancing to the rhythm of the coffee bean. [1]

 

From a Few Magical Coffee Berries to Global Phenomenon

The magic of these coffee berries traveled from the pockets of a delighted Kaldi to the hands of a local monk, who, in seeking solace for extended prayers, is believed to have brewed the first cup. This newfound concoction not only kept him alert but also sparked a tradition that would transcend centuries. The name ‘coffee’ itself is derived from the Arabic ‘qahwah’, poetically referred to as the ‘wine of the bean’.

From the Ethiopian plateaus, coffee’s allure traversed across Africa and spilled over to the Middle East, Europe, and the New World. Each culture it touched was transformed, as coffee became a symbol of hospitality, discussion, and pleasure. It soon became a commodity and was being traded on the bustling docks of trading ports, taxed by empires, and stirred debates.

Ethiopian Heritage & Tradition

In Ethiopia, the reverence for coffee has been immortalized through time-honored, coffee-drinking ceremonies [2]—a testament to its enduring legacy in Ethiopian coffee culture. These ceremonies are more than a mere act of brewing or a way to drink coffee.

Known as The Habesha Coffee Ceremony, is a significant social event traditionally hosted by the lady of the household and brings together friends, neighbors, and relatives to share stories over coffee. The process begins with roasting green beans, hand-grinding them, and brewing them in a clay pot called a jebena. Served in tiny cups with popcorn, this ritual encourages vibrant conversations, with the coffee often brewed several times for prolonged enjoyment. [8]

An Ethiopian woman grinding coffee beans with a mortar and pestle for the traditional coffee ceremony. - "The Black History of Coffee"An Ethiopian woman grinding coffee beans with a mortar and pestle for the traditional coffee ceremony.

 
Their coffee produced is as varied as it is flavorful, boasting world-renowned varieties like Yirgacheffe, known for its floral notes; Sidamo, with its bright citrusy undertones; and Harrar, with its wine-like and fruity essence. These coffees are not just beverages; they are an invitation to experience the pulse of Ethiopian life and are coveted by connoisseurs across the globe, each bean carrying a story that means much more than whether a label says it’s organic, light roast, dark roast, or if it’s 100% Arabica.
 
 

Africans’ Lasting Impact on the Coffee Trade

The bittersweetness of coffee’s history is profoundly interwoven with the experiences of Africans, whose contributions to the industry have been both transformative and enduring.

A Legacy Forgotten in Coffee History

The transatlantic slave trade, a grim passage in human history brought tons of millions of Africans to the Americas from the 16th century, 17th century, and up to the 19th century, where they became the backbone of the burgeoning agricultural economy. [7] Among the many crops they cultivated, coffee emerged as one of the most demanding yet profitable, with its success resting heavily upon the labor and expertise of these enslaved Africans.

Long before important certifications such as Fair Trade coffee existed, these coffee farmers’ hands sowed the seeds, tended the plants, and harvested the beans that would become the dark, aromatic drink savored around the world.

Despite the cruelty of their bondage, the enslaved Africans’ knowledge of coffee cultivation was indispensable. They brought traditional methods of coffee cultivation and processing from their homeland, adapting and perfecting these techniques on foreign coffee plantations. Even within these confines, they developed a mastery over the art of roasting and brewing, often creating variations of coffee that were unique to the New World.

In the wake of emancipation, African Americans continued to leave their mark on the coffee trade. No longer bound by the chains of slavery, many found new paths in the industry as sharecroppers, laborers, and even entrepreneurs. Their migration to regions prolific in growing coffee, such as Central America, South America, the Caribbean, and Hawaii, infused these coffee cultures with a rich diversity, drawing from ancestral knowledge and innovative spirit.

The narrative of African Americans in the coffee trade is not just one chapter but a complete story filled with many about resilience and ingenuity. Their legacy, though often overshadowed, is brewed into every cup of coffee we enjoy today, reminding us that the richness of coffee lies not just in its flavor, but in a part of its history truly worth celebrating.

African Americans’ More Recent Impact on Current Coffee Culture

Coffee was a beacon of inspiration and community for African Americans. Throughout history, coffee houses and cafes emerged as sanctuaries where they could assemble, socialize, and express themselves, especially during the oppressive era of segregation.

These establishments became epicenters for pivotal artistic and intellectual movements, notably the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and the Civil Rights Movement. They provided a space for African-American writers, artists, musicians, and activists to congregate, creating a vibrant atmosphere where coffee fueled creativity and symbolized resistance against societal constraints.

Figures, Past & Present Who Paved the Way to Better Coffee

Famous inventor, George Washington Carver posing for a black and white portrait in circa 1910. - "The Black History of Coffee"A Mind Responsible for More Than Peanut Innovations

George Washington Carver, a renowned African American scientist and inventor of the early 20th century, indirectly impacted coffee agriculture in the United States. While he is most famous for his work with peanuts, Carver’s research and teachings at the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama encompassed a wide range of crops, including methods that could potentially benefit coffee producers.

Not only did Carver’s approach to sustainable agriculture and his promotion of alternative crops provide valuable insights into coffee cultivation [3], but one major invention in coffee history he’s credited with discovering is the humble, instant coffee. [6]

There’s a Lot More to Brewing Coffee: Current Changemakers

Today, African Americans are prominent as not only connoisseurs but also as proprietors and innovators within the coffee sphere. They own farms, roasteries, and cafes, infusing their heritage and values into their brands. Advocacy for social justice, environmental sustainability, and economic empowerment is paramount in their ventures, contributing to a growing specialty coffee movement that prizes quality, diversity, and ethical standards.

Figures like Phyllis Johnson [4], founder of BD Imports, highlight this by sourcing quality coffee from Africa while supporting women and small farmers. A highlight of our journey as Coffee Cart Boys was meeting Keba Konte [4], the founder of Red Bay Coffee when we took a trip to his flagship store in Oakland, California.

Keba and his company exemplify social entrepreneurship by employing a diverse workforce and sharing profit. He was friendly and generous with his time, the coffee was insanely delicious, and we could feel his kindness and passion when talking to him. He inspired us to keep pursuing our dreams and to make a positive impact through coffee.

Thinking Outside The Coffee House and Writing New Chapters in Coffee History

We believe that one of the rising stars in the coffee industry is Coffee Cart Boys’ own Daniel Vasquez, an African-American entrepreneur who grew up in Pasadena, CA. Vasquez started his mobile coffee cart business with the idea of serving quality coffee to busy commuters and other residents of his community.

After beginning by selling exclusively fresh ground coffee online to friends and family, he soon expanded to serve a variety of freshly brewed coffee drinks at pop-up events around Los Angeles County, which then turned into paid catering services for events and large company meetings. Vasquez’s vision to create a coffee brand that reflects the diversity and vibrancy of his community is an evident contribution to the legacy of African Americans in the coffee industry.

As a company, we source our coffee beans from ethical and sustainable coffee farms and support local roasters and bakers who share Daniel’s passion for excellence and social responsibility. He also hopes in the future to mentor young people who aspire to join our industry and provide them with training and opportunities, looking to lower the barrier to entry in such a competitive field.

Coffee Cart Boys is more than a company; it’s a movement that aims to celebrate and empower underserved communities around the nation.

Conclusion

Coffee is more than a beverage; it’s a story steeped in the strength and resourcefulness of African Americans. As we honor Black History Month, we also pay tribute to the Black History of Coffee. We embrace and celebrate the legacy and the ongoing Black Coffee Movement, which continues to shape the future of coffee with each brew and every sip.

Let us raise our cups in acknowledgment and support of the trailblazers and innovators who have made coffee much more than just a drink—a symbol of unity, creativity, and community!

References

  1. The History of Coffee (ncausa.org)

  2. How to Perform an Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony (thespruceeats.com)

  3. George Washington Carver: Facts, Inventions & Quotes | HISTORY

  4. About Us – BD Imports

  5. Before He Became a Revolutionary Coffee Roaster, He Photographed Revolutionaries | Entrepreneur

  6. More than ‘The Peanut Man’ – USDA.gov

  7. Transatlantic Slave Trade

  8. Coffee Traditions: Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony – Archived Article from Serious Eats

Help celebrate Black History by working with our black-owned business.

…and let’s party! 🕺🏽🔥

Share This Post:

Table of Contents

Introduction

This article celebrates African Americans’ pivotal role in coffee’s history and culture, from its Ethiopian beginnings and heartwrenching journey across the globe to its inevitably positive impact in America.

Coffee is a cultural connector, sparks conversations, inspires creativity, and transcends being just a beverage, and by proxy, we must show gratitude for the Africans who discovered it. During Black History Month, we wanted to highlight the community’s resilience, innovation, and legacy in the coffee trade, and explore coffee’s journey from the Ethiopian highlands to American coffee culture, emphasizing African Americans’ contributions despite numerous known and unknown historical challenges.

So, join us in recognizing not just the eternal spirit of African Americans, but also their role as harbingers in shaping the coffee industry and making the beverage a symbol of cultural expression.

Ethiopian woman wearing traditional clothing and serving coffee in small cups. - "The Black History of Coffee"

A Tale of How the Black History of Coffee Began

Kaldi The Goat Herder

It’s widely believed and accepted that coffee’s journey began in the fertile highlands of Ethiopia, a land hailed as its birthplace. Here is where the Oromo people first cultivated coffee cherries, and the tale of their discovery traces back to a mere observation when a goat herder named Kaldi noticed strange behavior from his goats on any ordinary day.

A Tanzania citizen herding their goats on a dirt road at a large mountain base. - "The Black History of Coffee"

They had a certain liveliness he hadn’t seen before and noticed this as they grazed upon a bush covered with coffee cherries. Curiosity piqued, Kaldi sampled what he probably thought was a basic fruit, but soon he too was dancing to the rhythm of the coffee bean. [1]

 

From a Few Magical Coffee Berries to Global Phenomenon

The magic of these coffee berries traveled from the pockets of a delighted Kaldi to the hands of a local monk, who, in seeking solace for extended prayers, is believed to have brewed the first cup. This newfound concoction not only kept him alert but also sparked a tradition that would transcend centuries. The name ‘coffee’ itself is derived from the Arabic ‘qahwah’, poetically referred to as the ‘wine of the bean’.

From the Ethiopian plateaus, coffee’s allure traversed across Africa and spilled over to the Middle East, Europe, and the New World. Each culture it touched was transformed, as coffee became a symbol of hospitality, discussion, and pleasure. It soon became a commodity and was being traded on the bustling docks of trading ports, taxed by empires, and stirred debates.

Ethiopian Heritage & Tradition

In Ethiopia, the reverence for coffee has been immortalized through time-honored, coffee-drinking ceremonies [2]—a testament to its enduring legacy in Ethiopian coffee culture. These ceremonies are more than a mere act of brewing or a way to drink coffee.

Known as The Habesha Coffee Ceremony, is a significant social event traditionally hosted by the lady of the household and brings together friends, neighbors, and relatives to share stories over coffee. The process begins with roasting green beans, hand-grinding them, and brewing them in a clay pot called a jebena. Served in tiny cups with popcorn, this ritual encourages vibrant conversations, with the coffee often brewed several times for prolonged enjoyment. [8]

An Ethiopian woman grinding coffee beans with a mortar and pestle for the traditional coffee ceremony. - "The Black History of Coffee"An Ethiopian woman grinding coffee beans with a mortar and pestle for the traditional coffee ceremony.

 
Their coffee produced is as varied as it is flavorful, boasting world-renowned varieties like Yirgacheffe, known for its floral notes; Sidamo, with its bright citrusy undertones; and Harrar, with its wine-like and fruity essence. These coffees are not just beverages; they are an invitation to experience the pulse of Ethiopian life and are coveted by connoisseurs across the globe, each bean carrying a story that means much more than whether a label says it’s organic, light roast, dark roast, or if it’s 100% Arabica.
 
 

Africans’ Lasting Impact on the Coffee Trade

The bittersweetness of coffee’s history is profoundly interwoven with the experiences of Africans, whose contributions to the industry have been both transformative and enduring.

A Legacy Forgotten in Coffee History

The transatlantic slave trade, a grim passage in human history brought tons of millions of Africans to the Americas from the 16th century, 17th century, and up to the 19th century, where they became the backbone of the burgeoning agricultural economy. [7] Among the many crops they cultivated, coffee emerged as one of the most demanding yet profitable, with its success resting heavily upon the labor and expertise of these enslaved Africans.

Long before important certifications such as Fair Trade coffee existed, these coffee farmers’ hands sowed the seeds, tended the plants, and harvested the beans that would become the dark, aromatic drink savored around the world.

Despite the cruelty of their bondage, the enslaved Africans’ knowledge of coffee cultivation was indispensable. They brought traditional methods of coffee cultivation and processing from their homeland, adapting and perfecting these techniques on foreign coffee plantations. Even within these confines, they developed a mastery over the art of roasting and brewing, often creating variations of coffee that were unique to the New World.

In the wake of emancipation, African Americans continued to leave their mark on the coffee trade. No longer bound by the chains of slavery, many found new paths in the industry as sharecroppers, laborers, and even entrepreneurs. Their migration to regions prolific in growing coffee, such as Central America, South America, the Caribbean, and Hawaii, infused these coffee cultures with a rich diversity, drawing from ancestral knowledge and innovative spirit.

The narrative of African Americans in the coffee trade is not just one chapter but a complete story filled with many about resilience and ingenuity. Their legacy, though often overshadowed, is brewed into every cup of coffee we enjoy today, reminding us that the richness of coffee lies not just in its flavor, but in a part of its history truly worth celebrating.

African Americans’ More Recent Impact on Current Coffee Culture

Coffee was a beacon of inspiration and community for African Americans. Throughout history, coffee houses and cafes emerged as sanctuaries where they could assemble, socialize, and express themselves, especially during the oppressive era of segregation.

These establishments became epicenters for pivotal artistic and intellectual movements, notably the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and the Civil Rights Movement. They provided a space for African-American writers, artists, musicians, and activists to congregate, creating a vibrant atmosphere where coffee fueled creativity and symbolized resistance against societal constraints.

Figures, Past & Present Who Paved the Way to Better Coffee

Famous inventor, George Washington Carver posing for a black and white portrait in circa 1910. - "The Black History of Coffee"A Mind Responsible for More Than Peanut Innovations

George Washington Carver, a renowned African American scientist and inventor of the early 20th century, indirectly impacted coffee agriculture in the United States. While he is most famous for his work with peanuts, Carver’s research and teachings at the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama encompassed a wide range of crops, including methods that could potentially benefit coffee producers.

Not only did Carver’s approach to sustainable agriculture and his promotion of alternative crops provide valuable insights into coffee cultivation [3], but one major invention in coffee history he’s credited with discovering is the humble, instant coffee. [6]

There’s a Lot More to Brewing Coffee: Current Changemakers

Today, African Americans are prominent as not only connoisseurs but also as proprietors and innovators within the coffee sphere. They own farms, roasteries, and cafes, infusing their heritage and values into their brands. Advocacy for social justice, environmental sustainability, and economic empowerment is paramount in their ventures, contributing to a growing specialty coffee movement that prizes quality, diversity, and ethical standards.

Figures like Phyllis Johnson [4], founder of BD Imports, highlight this by sourcing quality coffee from Africa while supporting women and small farmers. A highlight of our journey as Coffee Cart Boys was meeting Keba Konte [4], the founder of Red Bay Coffee when we took a trip to his flagship store in Oakland, California.

Keba and his company exemplify social entrepreneurship by employing a diverse workforce and sharing profit. He was friendly and generous with his time, the coffee was insanely delicious, and we could feel his kindness and passion when talking to him. He inspired us to keep pursuing our dreams and to make a positive impact through coffee.

Thinking Outside The Coffee House and Writing New Chapters in Coffee History

We believe that one of the rising stars in the coffee industry is Coffee Cart Boys’ own Daniel Vasquez, an African-American entrepreneur who grew up in Pasadena, CA. Vasquez started his mobile coffee cart business with the idea of serving quality coffee to busy commuters and other residents of his community.

After beginning by selling exclusively fresh ground coffee online to friends and family, he soon expanded to serve a variety of freshly brewed coffee drinks at pop-up events around Los Angeles County, which then turned into paid catering services for events and large company meetings. Vasquez’s vision to create a coffee brand that reflects the diversity and vibrancy of his community is an evident contribution to the legacy of African Americans in the coffee industry.

As a company, we source our coffee beans from ethical and sustainable coffee farms and support local roasters and bakers who share Daniel’s passion for excellence and social responsibility. He also hopes in the future to mentor young people who aspire to join our industry and provide them with training and opportunities, looking to lower the barrier to entry in such a competitive field.

Coffee Cart Boys is more than a company; it’s a movement that aims to celebrate and empower underserved communities around the nation.

Conclusion

Coffee is more than a beverage; it’s a story steeped in the strength and resourcefulness of African Americans. As we honor Black History Month, we also pay tribute to the Black History of Coffee. We embrace and celebrate the legacy and the ongoing Black Coffee Movement, which continues to shape the future of coffee with each brew and every sip.

Let us raise our cups in acknowledgment and support of the trailblazers and innovators who have made coffee much more than just a drink—a symbol of unity, creativity, and community!

References

  1. The History of Coffee (ncausa.org)

  2. How to Perform an Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony (thespruceeats.com)

  3. George Washington Carver: Facts, Inventions & Quotes | HISTORY

  4. About Us – BD Imports

  5. Before He Became a Revolutionary Coffee Roaster, He Photographed Revolutionaries | Entrepreneur

  6. More than ‘The Peanut Man’ – USDA.gov

  7. Transatlantic Slave Trade

  8. Coffee Traditions: Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony – Archived Article from Serious Eats

Help celebrate Black History by working with our black-owned business.

…and let’s party! 🕺🏽🔥

Share This Post:

Table of Contents

Meet the Author:

Picture of Sean Ireton
Sean Ireton
Sean is our spirited Creative Director and CMO at Coffee Cart Boys. After mastering much of the digital realm, he steers our website and executes our marketing strategies. A devoted coffee enthusiast, Sean has spent over 3 years globetrotting locally and internationally to uncover the finest beans, techniques, and flavors. His mission? To share his wisdom, and ultimately help you fall in love with coffee's purest flavor, while learning to appreciate its history, processing, and more.

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